Archive for category: Press

The Filson to Host Author Nathaniel Philbrick on June 22

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The Filson Historical Society will host the Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series on Wednesday, June 22 at 6:00 p.m. at the Brown Theatre, featuring author Nathaniel Philbrick. Philbrick will discuss his new book, “Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy,” which argues for Washington’s unique contribution to the forging of America by retracing his journey as a new president through all thirteen former colonies, which were now an unsure nation.

When George Washington became president in 1789, the United States of America was still a loose and quarrelsome confederation and a tentative political experiment. Washington undertook a tour of the ex-colonies to talk to ordinary citizens about his new government, and to imbue in them the idea of being one thing—Americans.

In the fall of 2018, Nathaniel Philbrick embarked on his own journey into what Washington called “the infant woody country” to see for himself what America had become in the 229 years since. Writing in a thoughtful first person about his own adventures with his wife, Melissa, and their dog, Dora, Philbrick follows Washington’s presidential excursions: from Mount Vernon to the new capital in New York; a monthlong tour of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island; a venture onto Long Island and eventually across Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The narrative moves smoothly between the eighteenth and twenty-first centuries as we see the country through both Washington’s and Philbrick’s eyes.

Written at a moment when America’s founding figures are under increasing scrutiny, Travels with George grapples bluntly and honestly with Washington’s legacy as a man of the people, a reluctant president, and a plantation owner who held people in slavery. At historic houses and landmarks, Philbrick reports on the reinterpretations at work as he meets reenactors, tour guides, and other keepers of history’s flame. He paints a picture of eighteenth-century America as divided and fraught as it is today, and he comes to understand how Washington compelled, enticed, stood up to, and listened to the many different people he met along the way—and how his all-consuming belief in the union helped to forge a nation.

Nathaniel Philbrick grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and earned a BA in English from Brown University and an MA in America Literature from Duke University, where he was a James B. Duke Fellow. He was Brown University’s first Intercollegiate All-American sailor in 1978, the same year he won the Sunfish North Americans in Barrington, Rhode Island. After working as an editor at Sailing World magazine, he wrote and edited several books about sailing, including “The Passionate Sailor,” “Second Wind,” and “Yaahting: A Parody.” In 2000, Philbrick published the “New York Times” bestseller “In the Heart of the Sea,” which won the National Book Award for nonfiction. The book is the basis of the Warner Bros. motion picture “Heart of the Sea,” directed by Ron Howard and starring Chris Hemsworth, Cillian Murphy, Brendan Gleeson, Benjamin Walker, Ben Wishaw, and Tom Holland. The book also inspired a 2001 Dateline special on NBC as well as the 2010 two-hour PBS American Experience film “Into the Deep” by Ric Burns.   Philbrick’s writing has appeared in “Vanity Fair,” “The New York Times Book Review,” “The Wall Street Journal,” the “Los Angeles Times,” and the “Boston Globe”. He has appeared on the “Today” show, “The Morning Show,” “Dateline,” PBS’s “American Experience”, C-SPAN, and NPR.

The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series will be held on Wednesday, June 22 at 6:00 p.m. at the Brown Theatre, 315 W. Broadway, Louisville. Tickets are free for Filson members and $27.20 for non-members (taxes and fees included).  Tickets for this event must be purchased from The Kentucky Center Ticket Service. Please call (502) 584-7777 or visit kentuckyperformingarts.org for tickets

Initiated in 1993 as a memorial to the life of Gertrude Polk Brown and made possible by the generous support of her children, Dace Brown Stubbs and G. Garvin Brown III. The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series has brought both nationally and internationally recognized historians and journalists to Louisville, many of them Pulitzer Prize winners. Speakers are selected based on their overall excellence in research, writing, and speaking and are not restricted to historians. The Filson hosts up to five lectures per year in this series.

The Filson to host public opening for “Forgotten Foundations”

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society will host a public exhibit opening for Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture on Tuesday, April 26, 2022, from 4:30-5:45 p.m. This exhibit is curated by Jana Meyer and Danielle Spalenka.

Forgotten Foundations explores the rise, fall, and revitalization of the urban core. For much of its history, Downtown Louisville was the foundation and heart of the city. Downtown became a hub for many businesses in a post-Civil War building boom. Grand buildings with intricate architectural details were a visual symbol of Louisville’s growing economic power. But as people and businesses relocated to the suburbs, downtown saw a major decline. Buildings once seen as architectural gems were now perceived as outdated. Urban renewal and the expansion of expressways meant that many buildings foundational to the city were demolished. This exhibit will remember what was lost through architectural and photographic records left behind.

The opening reception will feature refreshments and short remarks from the curator and sponsors at 5:30 p.m. All participants must register in advance. To register for this event, please visit www.filsonhistorical.org. This event is free and open to the public.

Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture is generously sponsored by Stock Yards Bank and Trust.

After the opening, the Filson will host Michael Koch for a lecture on his book, Close to Home, which presents the author’s creative, award-winning work and introduces readers to the simple elegance of his designs and meaningful contributions he has made to the landscape of Kentucky. Close to Home is an associated program with Forgotten Foundations, and features projects within a 15-mile radius of Louisville. This event is separate from the exhibit opening and will require a separate registration. “Close to Home” is open to the public, but registration is required. Close to Home is free and open to the public.

“Forgotten Foundations” is open for viewing Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd Street, Louisville. Tours of the exhibit and grounds are free, but reservations are strongly encouraged.

For more information about this exhibit, please contact Maureen Lane, Curator of Museum Collections at gro.l1660740311aciro1660740311tsihn1660740311oslif1660740311@neer1660740311uam1660740311 or (502) 635-5083. For more information on Filson events, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

Owsley Brown II History Center receives AIA award

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society’s Owsley Brown II History Center has received a 2022 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Award. The 2022 Architecture program celebrates the best contemporary architecture regardless of budget, size, style, or type. A nine-member jury selected submissions that demonstrate design achievement, including a sense of place, purpose, history, and environmental sustainability.

“This is a wonderful honor for the architects and for The Filson Historical Society. The building is spectacularly beautiful and highly functional.  It serves as a fantastic place to explore history, a welcome anchor to Old Louisville’s streetscape, and a gathering space for our city, state and region,” said Richard H. C. Clay, President and CEO of the Filson.  “We are grateful to the American Institute of Architects for this recognition.”

The Owsley Brown II History Center, designed by de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop, opened in October 2016 as part of the larger renovation of the Filson’s campus at 3rd and Ormsby. The building has been the recipient of several design awards in addition to the recent AIA award and has been featured in several premier architectural publications.

“We appreciate what a unique opportunity it was to collaborate with the Filson Historical Society’s incredible leadership and personnel on this multi-layered project,” said Roberto de Leon and Ross Primmer in a joint statement. “This highest honor from our peers, and inclusion in such an accomplished group of international projects, reflects both the ongoing vision and tireless commitment of all those involved in the project’s realization.”

For more information about the award, please visit www.aia.org.

About AIA
Founded in 1857, AIA consistently works to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through more than 200 international, state and local chapters, AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public wellbeing.

AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation, and world. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards.

About the Filson Historical Society

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

The Filson opens new exhibit on Louisville’s lost architecture

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society is proud to announce the opening of their latest exhibit, Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture on February 18. This exhibit is curated by Jana Meyer and Danielle Spalenka.

Forgotten Foundations explores the rise, fall, and revitalization of the urban core. For much of its history, Downtown Louisville was the foundation and heart of the city. Downtown became a hub for many businesses in a post-Civil War building boom. Grand buildings with intricate architectural details were a visual symbol of Louisville’s growing economic power. But as people and businesses relocated to the suburbs, downtown saw a major decline. Buildings once seen as architectural gems were now perceived as outdated. Urban renewal and the expansion of expressways meant that many buildings foundational to the city were demolished. This exhibit will remember what was lost through architectural and photographic records left behind.

Forgotten Foundations will be open for viewing Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd Street, Louisville. Tours of the exhibit and grounds are free, but reservations are strongly encouraged.

The Filson will host a public exhibit opening Tuesday, April 26, 2022, from 4:30-5:45 p.m. The reception will feature refreshments and short remarks from the curator and sponsors at 5:30 p.m. Small groups of 10 will be allowed in the exhibit at one time to view them and speak with the curators. All participants must register in advance. Masks and proof of Covid-19 vaccination or a negative Covid test in the preceding 48 hours are required to attend this event. To register for this event, please visit www.filsonhistorical.org. This event is free and open to the public.

Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture is generously sponsored by Stock Yards Bank and Trust.

After the opening, the Filson will host Michael Koch for a lecture on his book, Close to Home, which presents the author’s creative, award-winning work and introduces readers to the simple elegance of his designs and meaningful contributions he has made to the landscape of Kentucky. “Close to Home” is an associated program with Forgotten Foundations, and features projects within a 15-mile radius of Louisville. This event is separate from the exhibit opening and will require a separate registration. Close to Home is open to the public, but registration is required. Close to Home is free for Filson members and $15 for non-members. Masks and proof of Covid-19 vaccination or a negative Covid test in the preceding 48 hours are required to attend this event.

For more information about this exhibit, please contact Maureen Lane, Curator of Museum Collections at gro.l1660740311aciro1660740311tsihn1660740311oslif1660740311@neer1660740311uam1660740311 or (502) 635-5083. For more information on Filson events, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

The Filson Announces Access Program for Low-income Families

Louisville, Ky – Today the Filson Historical Society announced that it has joined Museums for All, a signature access program of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), administered by the Association of Children’s Museums (ACM), to encourage people of all backgrounds to visit museums regularly and build lifelong museum-going habits. The program supports those receiving food assistance (SNAP) benefits receiving a Filson for All membership for one family (two adults and all children 18 and under living in the household) with the presentation of a SNAP Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card. Similar free and reduced admission is available to eligible members of the public at more than 800 museums across the country. Museums for All is part of the Filson’s broad commitment to provide access to anyone for whom cost may be a barrier to visiting the Filson.

The Filson for All membership provides one family (two adults and all children 18 and under living in the household) with access to publications, including “The Filson” newsmagazine and “Ohio Valley History,” a scholarly journal published jointly by the Filson, the Cincinnati Museum Center, and the University of Cincinnati. Members will also receive member pricing to over 40 Filson events per year, one free hour of research or consulting by phone or email, and a reduced rate of $35 per hour for additional research.

For more information on the Filson’s upcoming events, please visit filsonhistorical.org/events or call (502) 635-5083. For more information on the Filson’s Covid-19 policies, please refer to the reopening plan listed on the website.

Museums for All helps expand access to museums and raise public awareness about how museums in the U.S. are reaching their entire communities. More than 800 institutions participate in the initiative, including art museums, children’s museums, science centers, botanical gardens, zoos, history museums, and more. Participating museums are located nationwide, representing all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Virgin Islands.

About the Filson Historical Society

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Association of Children’s Museums (ACM)

The Association of Children’s Museums (ACM) champions children’s museums worldwide. With more than 470 members in 50 states and 16 countries, ACM leverages the collective knowledge of children’s museums through convening, sharing, and dissemination. Learn more at www.childrensmuseums.org.

Kentucky’s Education Proposals: An Open Letter to Our Membership

LOUISVILLE, KY – As you are probably aware, there are four bills proposed in the Kentucky General Assembly (House Bills 14, 18, 487 and Senate Bill 138) that seek to limit the ability of school boards and teachers to teach complex lessons from American history to Kentucky public school students—particularly around issues of race and gender. The Filson Historical Society’s new strategic plan challenges us to help communities build a stronger present and future through learning from their past. So, we invite you to join us in opposition to these efforts to limit the intellectual freedom of Kentucky students and educators.

The Filson aligns itself on this issue with the Kentucky Commissioner of Education and the American Historical Association. “Educators must provide an accurate view of the past in order to better prepare students for community participation and robust civic engagement,” writes the AHA. History is an act that calls all of us together to explore, question, and debate. There are ideas and actions that we should all justly celebrate in American history, as well as individual and structural failings which we should not just condemn but work to avoid in our present and future. “Suppressing or watering down discussion of ‘divisive concepts’ in educational institutions,” the AHA statement continues, “deprives students of opportunities to discuss and foster solutions to social divisions and injustice.”

Senate Bill 138 provides a list of primary sources, important pieces of legislation or public speeches, that it demands must be included in appropriate grade-level public school history curricula. The Filson supports the critical use of primary sources in history education and has long provided both original material and guiding questions to classrooms. Beyond critiquing the narrow document selection, the idea of creating curriculum by legislation is irresponsible in the democratic society which these bills purportedly celebrate. Doing so ignores the professional judgment and training of educators, who have both deep content knowledge and training in age-appropriate teaching and learning techniques. It ignores the democratic process whereby local curricula are shaped by school boards who can be held accountable by their communities.

House Bill 18 authorizes disciplinary action against teachers, and House Bill 14 lays out steps for investigating and fining school districts who might be accused of teaching with facts and historical documents which the framers of these bills wish excluded from public instruction. House Bill 487 provides for the prosecution of teachers in Circuit Court and seeks to impose a faulty definition of “revisionist history” that would outlaw the teaching of over fifty years of American history scholarship, including the publications of the Filson. This is a chilling move to punish and discourage free speech that stands directly opposed to the Filson’s mission of collecting, preserving, and sharing the full history of our state and region.

The Filson depends on a membership that is raised to explore and question our past in the service of our future. Freedom and constructively critical curiosity, not simply celebration, is the hallmark of a healthy society. The Filson, as a private nonprofit organization, is fortunately not subject to the restrictions that these bills seek to mandate. Yet the Filson recognizes that public education shapes the next generation of our membership. To remain as strong, vibrant, relevant, and diverse as our wonderful organization has become, we must resist such overreaching efforts now.

If you are so inclined, we urge you to contact your legislator via the Legislative Research Commission by telephone (800-372-7181) or email to your individual representative as soon as possible to voice opposition to these or any bills that would overrule the professional judgment of teachers, deny the democratic mandate of local school boards, and restrict the right of Kentucky students to fully understand the world they will inherit and lead.

 

Sincerely,

Richard H. C. Clay, President & CEO

John Stern, Chairman of the Board of Directors

The Filson receives ARP grant from Kentucky Humanities

Louisville, Ky – The Filson Historical Society is thrilled to report on all that the organization has accomplished with the American Rescue Plan grant it received from Kentucky Humanities.

Through the receipt of the American Rescue Plan grant from Kentucky Humanities, the Filson was able to fund general operating costs for the organization while closed to the public due to the Coronavirus pandemic. The Filson closed to the public for more than a year due to the ongoing public health crisis, halting in-person events including research appointments, lectures, programs, and special events. Despite the closure to the public, no staff were furloughed or let go; instead, the organization switched to a completely digital format for programs and research, all of which were free to the public.

The Filson’s online presence has grown exponentially with the switch to remote work, allowing individuals who were unable to physically visit the Filson, whether due to COVID-19 or other restrictions, to engage virtually with 44 digital collections and 28 exhibits. The organization offered 59 programs, and Filson staff delivered 24 talks in the community. These efforts resulted in 8,342 people being served with expanded outreach to people from 35 states and 6 countries including the United States.

The Filson reopened for in-person research appointments on September 1, 2021. All events continue to be held virtually through the end of December.

For more information on the Filson’s upcoming events, please visit filsonhistorical.org/events or call (502) 635-5083. For more information on the Filson’s Covid-19 policies, please refer to the reopening plan listed on the website.

This project is partially funded by Kentucky Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or Kentucky Humanities.

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

The Filson receives grant from the NEH SHARP

Louisville, Ky – The Filson Historical Society is thrilled to announce that it has received an award from the National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan (#SHARP) grant. The award, totaling $146,364, will allow the Filson to revive and expand a digital history project, “The First American West, the Ohio River Valley, 1750-1870.”

The original project was a collaboration between the Filson, the University of Chicago, and the Library of Congress, and has been offline since 2016. The Filson will use these funds to convert old files, scan new documents, objects, and maps to bring new historical voices to users, launch a new crowdsourcing transcription initiative, and host public programming throughout 2022 on the topics of digital history and the early-American frontier.

“This project lets us reflect on two important eras, the period of settler conflict that brought European, Indigenous, and African people and ideas into Kentucky and the early experimentation with digital technology to enable people to engage the past in new ways,” says Patrick Lewis, Director of Collections & Research at the Filson. “I am looking forward to interesting conversations about what greater representation, inclusion, and access to the historical record can mean for our society today and in the future.”

For more information on the Filson’s upcoming events, please visit filsonhistorical.org/events or call (502) 635-5083. At this time, all programming is being held virtually through December 31, 2021, with a few exceptions. For more information on the Filson’s Covid-19 policies, please refer to the reopening plan listed on the website.

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this press release do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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The Filson Historical Society Reopens to the Public September 1

Louisville, Ky – Beginning September 1, the Filson Historical Society will reopen to the public for guided campus tours, research appointments, and rental space tours.  Previously, the Filson had been closed to the public during the Covid-19 pandemic. Staff have been working on campus and remotely in accordance with Kentucky’s “Healthy at Work” guidelines since March 2020.

Guests over the age of 12 are required to show proof of Covid-19 vaccination and wear a mask when visiting the Filson’s campus or participating in a Filson-sponsored indoor event. Visitors may show their vaccination card or a photo of their card. Those unable to be vaccinated will need to show proof of a negative Covid test within the 48 hours prior to their planned visit. Either a printed or electronic copy of the results will be accepted.

All programming will continue to be held virtually until December 31, 2021, with a few exceptions. Reservations are suggested for all in-person events, tours, and research appointments. The Filson’s exhibition galleries will be open to walk-in visitors.

Reservations can be made online at filsonhistorical.org/events or by calling the Filson at (502) 635-5083. The Filson is open Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Guided tours are available each day at 2:00 p.m. For a list of upcoming events, please visit filsonhistorical.org/events. For more information about utilizing the Filson’s collection in-person or remotely, please visit us online at filsonhistorical.org or contact the Filson directly via email at gro.l1660740311aciro1660740311tsihn1660740311oslif1660740311@hcra1660740311eser1660740311.

The Filson asks that all visitors adhere to these new policies to ensure the safety of our staff, visitors, and community. Questions or concerns may be directed to President and CEO Richard H. C. Clay via phone at (502) 635-5083, or by email at gro.l1660740311aciro1660740311tsihn1660740311oslif1660740311@ofni1660740311. The Filson will continue to monitor the situation and update these policies as guidance from the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the CDC changes. The full reopening plan can be found online at filsonhistorical.org.

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Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

The Filson announces the Kentucky Covid-19 Poster Project

Louisville, Ky – The Filson Historical Society is excited to announce a new initiative, the Kentucky Covid-19 Poster Project. Inspired by the Covid-19 Poster Project at the Wisconsin Historical Society and other Covid-19 art actions throughout the country, this project leverages the power of words and images to document, interpret, and find inspiration in a challenging historical moment.

With support from The Snowy Owl Foundation and Mountjoy Chilton Medley, seven Kentuckiana artists received a commission of $250 to design posters that will be added to the Filson’s Covid-19 Community Collection. The artists chosen are:

Shae Goodlett, whose love of drawing started in elementary school. When asked what he tries to convey with his artwork, he said, “I think primarily what I want to do with my work is engage the viewer and have them relate. Whether it’s making them laugh with a one-liner illustration or trying to prompt some subconscious connection to a bizarre surrealist composition, I find engagement and accessibility of content to be most important.”

Amiya Crawford, who strives to allow her viewers to feel intrigued, or, in her words, “invited in to look and understand the work from their own lens of understanding. I would liken it to wanting someone to take a stone and turn it over in their hands, observe its color and texture, all of its little details, and then decide whether they’d carry that stone home with them or leave it on the ground.”

Tad DeSanto, a self-taught artist whose primary goal is, “to get people to think, to question and to relate to the sometimes-absurd realities of life in America, perhaps accompanied by a sly smile or stifled laughter. Making something from nothing is magical. When the image I’ve created touches another person’s heart I feel a special connection that is beyond words. My art takes me to another place where thoughts, memories and feelings collide. I want my work to make people think, smile and laugh.”

Mallory Lucas, a printmaker whose practice has been directly impacted by Covid-19. When asked what she strives to convey through her work, she said, “My work is whimsical and humorous but also deals with serious themes of otherness and social inequality and exclusion. My work is ambivalent, sometimes focusing on feelings of isolation and rejection from being “normal,” but often it celebrates instances of difference causing joy.”

Keith Rose, a screen-printer who strives to point out that it’s okay to be yourself through his art. In his words, “I’ve always been very uniquely me whether it’s appropriate or not. I didn’t, however, always have the voice to stand up for myself.”

Patricia Fulce-Smith, a multi-media artist who has created several murals throughout the city. Her passion is creating pieces that depict women and girls–especially those who’ve had to be strong. She finds herself in each woman or girl that she paints or creates. Patricia says, “I breathe through my art. I find myself through their stories.”

Paul “Arte” Chambers, a printmaker who finds inspiration from American social issues, old styles of artwork, social disruptions, and dialogue about human issues. When asked how he hopes others view his work, Chambers said he wants his work to “spark conversation and to question what the viewer believes in.”

In addition, the posters funded by the Kentucky Covid-19 Poster Project will be sold online starting November 24, 2020 and will continue until December 30, 2020. All proceeds of the poster sales will benefit the Artists Relief Trust, a local coalition of arts organizations and private philanthropists providing small grants to Kentuckian artists in need during these difficult times. More information about the project and poster sales can be found online at www.filsonhistorical.org/collections/covid-19-poster-project.

Questions about the Covid-19 poster project should be directed to Maureen Lane via phone at (502) 635-5083 or by email at gro.l1660740311aciro1660740311tsihn1660740311oslif1660740311@neer1660740311uam1660740311.

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Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and tell the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.