Archive for category: Press

The Filson Announces Spring 2023 Fellowship Recipients

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The Filson Historical Society is pleased to announce the winners of the Spring 2023 round of Filson Fellowships. These fellowships encourage the scholarly use of our nationally significant collections by providing researchers with financial support for travel and lodging. Candidates were chosen from a strong pool of applicants from around the country and internationally with research interests related to the history and culture of Kentucky and the Ohio Valley.

The following candidate has been awarded a one-week Filson Fellowship:

Dr. Matthew Stanley, Associate Professor of History, University of Arkansas, “Capital Reconciliation: Owners, Workers, and the Political Economy of Blue-Gray Reunion.”

The following candidate has been awarded a two-week Filson Fellowship:

Dr. Robert Murray, Associate Professor of History, Mercy College, “Hemp in the Ohio Valley.”

The Filson anticipates that fellows will publish the results of their research in “Ohio Valley History,” a peer-reviewed journal published jointly by the Filson, the Cincinnati Museum Center, and the University of Cincinnati.

To learn more about the Filson’s fellowship programs, please visit filsonhistorical.org/education/research-fellowships/. Filson Fellowships are made possible in part by the Bullitt Homestead Preservation Trust and the Boehl Trust.

###

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and tell the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, events, and rental space.

The Filson to host The Old Seelbach Jazz Bar Reunion Concert April 16

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The Filson Historical Society will host The Old Seelbach Jazz Bar Reunion Concert, the first installment in the annual Jazz at the Filson series on Sunday, April 16. The concert features Dick Sisto, Tyrone Wheeler, Jason Tiemann, and special guest Steve Davis

Jazz at the Filson is a three-part series of jazz presentations directed and curated by internationally recognized vibraphonist and composer Dick Sisto. Sisto, the music director at Old Seelbach Bar from the late 1980s through 2010, studied with Chicago Symphony mallet maestro Jose Bethancourt and later with Vibe Master Gary Burton.

The Old Seelbach Jazz Bar Reunion Concert will feature the Tri-Tones, a trio made up of Sisto, Tyrone Wheeler on bass, and Jason Tiemann on drums. The Tri-Tones played at the Old Seelbach Bar during happy hour and late-night shows five days a week, along with a weekend guest program. The trio will be joined by Steve Davis, an internationally renowned trombonist, and a frequent guest on the Tri-Tones weekend set. His style captivates audiences with beautiful lyricism combined with masterful Bebop. The list of the greats he has worked with is too long to mention but includes Jackie McClean and Chick Corea.

Jazz at the Filson will be held on Sunday, April 16, 2023 from 3:00-5:00 pm in the Owsley Brown II History Center at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd St., Louisville. This event is $30 for Filson members and $35 for non-members. Seating is limited and registration is required. For more information about this event, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

The Filson to host Katherine Howe as GPB speaker on March 14

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The Filson Historical Society will host the Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series on Tuesday, March 14 at 6:00 p.m. at The Kentucky Center – Bomhard Theater. Featuring “New York Times” bestselling author Katherine Howe and the book she wrote with Anderson Cooper, “Vanderbilt: The Rise and Fall of an American Dynasty,” this interview style lecture will be moderated by Richard Clay, President and CEO of the Filson.

When eleven-year-old Cornelius Vanderbilt began to work on his father’s small boat ferrying supplies in New York Harbor at the beginning of the nineteenth century, no one could have imagined that one day he would, through ruthlessness, cunning, and a pathological desire for money, build two empires—one in shipping and another in railroads—that would make him the richest man in America. His staggering fortune was fought over by his heirs after his death in 1877, sowing familial discord that would never fully heal. Though his son Billy doubled the money left by “the Commodore,” subsequent generations competed to find new and ever more extraordinary ways of spending it. By 2018, when the last Vanderbilt was forced out of The Breakers—the seventy-room summer estate in Newport, Rhode Island, that Cornelius’s grandson and namesake had built—the family would have been unrecognizable to the tycoon who started it all.

Now, the Commodore’s great-great-great-grandson Anderson Cooper, joins with historian Katherine Howe to explore the story of his legendary family and their outsized influence. Cooper and Howe breathe life into the ancestors who built the family’s empire, basked in the Commodore’s wealth, hosted lavish galas, and became synonymous with unfettered American capitalism and high society. Moving from the hardscrabble wharves of old Manhattan to the lavish drawing rooms of Gilded Age Fifth Avenue, from the ornate summer palaces of Newport to the courts of Europe, and all the way to modern-day New York, Cooper and Howe wryly recount the triumphs and tragedies of an American dynasty unlike any other.

Written with a unique insider’s viewpoint, this is a rollicking, quintessentially American history as remarkable as the family it so vividly captures.

Katherine Howe is a “New York Times” bestselling and award-winning writer of historical fiction. Her adult novels are “The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane,” which debuted at #2 on the “New York Times” bestseller list in 2009 and was named one of “USA Today’s” top ten books of the year, and “The House of Velvet and Glass,” which was a “USA Today” bestseller in 2011. For young adults, Katherine has written “Conversion,” which received the 2015 Massachusetts Book Award in young adult literature, and a New York City-based literary ghost story called “The Appearance of Annie van Sinderen,” which was named a 2016 “Must Read” for young adults by the Massachusetts Center for the Book. In 2014, she edited “The Penguin Book of Witches” for Penguin Classics, a primary source reader on the history of witchcraft in England and North America which made a regional bestseller list and which has been translated into Spanish and Russian. “The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs,” her latest novel for adults, was published by Henry Holt and Co in summer 2019. She co-wrote “Vanderbilt: The Rise and Fall of an American Dynasty” with Anderson Cooper, out now from Harper. Her upcoming books include her next novel, “A True Account of Hannah Masury’s Sojourn Amongst the Pyrates, Written by Herself,” forthcoming 11/21/23 from Holt, along with a nonfiction reader called “The Penguin Book of Pirates”. She is currently at work on her next project with Cooper, also for next fall, called “Astor”.

The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series will be held on Tuesday, March 14 at 6:00 p.m. at the Kentucky Center – Bomhard Theater, 501 West Main St., Louisville. Tickets are free for Filson members and $26.33 for non-members (taxes and fees included).  Tickets for this event must be purchased from The Kentucky Center Ticket Service. Please call (502) 584-7777 or visit kentuckyperformingarts.org for tickets.

Initiated in 1993 as a memorial to the life of Gertrude Polk Brown and made possible by the generous support of her children, Dace Brown Stubbs and G. Garvin Brown III. The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series has brought both nationally and internationally recognized historians and journalists to Louisville, many of them Pulitzer Prize winners. Speakers are selected based on their overall excellence in research, writing, and speaking and are not restricted to historians. The Filson hosts up to five lectures per year in this series.

“People, Passage, Place: Stories of the Ohio Valley” opens Jan. 13

 

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society will host a public exhibit opening for “People, Passage, Place: Stories of the Ohio Valley” on Friday, January 13, 2023 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. This exhibit is curated by Emma Bryan, Hannah Costelle, Abby Glogower, Kelly Hyberger, James J. Holmberg, Maureen Lane, Patrick A. Lewis, Heather J. Potter, and Brooks Vessels.

“People, Passage, Place” reimagines ways for visitors to engage with the Filson’s collections and invites them to think about how history shapes their lives and communities. The exhibit distills more than 250 years of history and the Filson’s millions of portraits, objects, manuscripts, and photographs into three thematic sections: Land, Water, Labor; People, Family, Community; and Culture, Creativity, Craft. Personal and family stories open conversations about important themes that have and will impact our region. The exhibit will be a long-term feature in the Nash Gallery but has been designed to stay relevant by allowing staff to regularly rotate in new items and share interesting stories found in the depths of the Filson’s collections.

The opening reception on January 13 will feature refreshments and short remarks from the curators and sponsors at 5:15 p.m. All participants must register in advance. To register for this event, please visit www.filsonhistorical.org. This event is free and open to the public.

“People, Passage, Place: Stories of the Ohio Valley” is generously sponsored by Stock Yards Bank and Trust.

“People, Passage, Place” will be open for viewing Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm beginning Monday, January 16, 2023, at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd Street, Louisville. Tours of the exhibit and grounds are free, but reservations are strongly encouraged.

For more information about this exhibit, please contact Maureen Lane, Curator of Museum Collections at gro.l1716532972aciro1716532972tsihn1716532972oslif1716532972@neer1716532972uam1716532972 or (502) 635-5083. For more information on Filson events, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

The Filson Historical Society to host a public exhibit opening Nov. 4

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society will host a public exhibit opening for “Olde England on the Ohio: Louisville’s Tudor Revival” on Friday, November 4, 2022, from 5:00-6:00 p.m. This exhibit is guest curated by Dr. Daniel Gifford.

Louisville’s residents and visitors often note the city’s proliferation of Tudor Revival architecture. From homes to businesses, churches to charities, Louisville has retained an impressive Tudor Revival collection, including several neighborhoods where it is the dominant style. “Olde England on the Ohio: Louisville’s Tudor Revival” uses Louisville as a microcosm of a larger national movement that peaked in the 1920s and early 1930s. Tudor Revival not only manifested through architecture, but also in consumer products and popular culture. The exhibit shows the range of ways Americans looked to recreate a near-mythic “Merrie Olde England” in the early twentieth century.

Importantly, it was no accident that this turn towards an imaginary English past coincided with a wave of Eastern European immigrants, a massive African-American migration to northern cities, and the refinement of continued systems of racial, religious, and ethnic injustice. Many explicitly saw Tudor Revival as a way of claiming and elevating Anglo-Saxon heritage for a select few.

But in Louisville these attempts ultimately failed. “Olde England on the Ohio” demonstrates how diverse groups across the city used Tudor Revival to make their own assertations about belonging and participation in American culture. The objects, images, and artifacts gathered in the exhibit ultimately suggest that Tudor Revival succeeded as a movement built from the ground up, not the top down.

Dr. Daniel Gifford is a public historian who focuses on American popular and visual culture, as well as museums in American culture.  He received his Ph.D. from George Mason University in 2011 and serves on the Filson Historical Society’s Board of Directors.

The opening reception on November 4 will feature refreshments and short remarks from the curator and sponsors at 5:15 p.m. All participants must register in advance. To register for this event, please visit www.filsonhistorical.org. This event is free and open to the public.

“Olde England on the Ohio: Louisville’s Tudor Revival” is generously sponsored by Stock Yards Bank and Trust.

“Olde England on the Ohio” will be open for viewing Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm beginning Monday, November 7, 2022 at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd Street, Louisville. Tours of the exhibit and grounds are free, but reservations are strongly encouraged.

For more information about this exhibit, please contact Maureen Lane, Curator of Museum Collections at gro.l1716532972aciro1716532972tsihn1716532972oslif1716532972@neer1716532972uam1716532972 or (502) 635-5083. For more information on Filson events, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

###

 

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and tell the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and houses a library, a museum and a special collections department.

The Filson to Host Author Nathaniel Philbrick on June 22

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The Filson Historical Society will host the Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series on Wednesday, June 22 at 6:00 p.m. at the Brown Theatre, featuring author Nathaniel Philbrick. Philbrick will discuss his new book, “Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy,” which argues for Washington’s unique contribution to the forging of America by retracing his journey as a new president through all thirteen former colonies, which were now an unsure nation.

When George Washington became president in 1789, the United States of America was still a loose and quarrelsome confederation and a tentative political experiment. Washington undertook a tour of the ex-colonies to talk to ordinary citizens about his new government, and to imbue in them the idea of being one thing—Americans.

In the fall of 2018, Nathaniel Philbrick embarked on his own journey into what Washington called “the infant woody country” to see for himself what America had become in the 229 years since. Writing in a thoughtful first person about his own adventures with his wife, Melissa, and their dog, Dora, Philbrick follows Washington’s presidential excursions: from Mount Vernon to the new capital in New York; a monthlong tour of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island; a venture onto Long Island and eventually across Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The narrative moves smoothly between the eighteenth and twenty-first centuries as we see the country through both Washington’s and Philbrick’s eyes.

Written at a moment when America’s founding figures are under increasing scrutiny, Travels with George grapples bluntly and honestly with Washington’s legacy as a man of the people, a reluctant president, and a plantation owner who held people in slavery. At historic houses and landmarks, Philbrick reports on the reinterpretations at work as he meets reenactors, tour guides, and other keepers of history’s flame. He paints a picture of eighteenth-century America as divided and fraught as it is today, and he comes to understand how Washington compelled, enticed, stood up to, and listened to the many different people he met along the way—and how his all-consuming belief in the union helped to forge a nation.

Nathaniel Philbrick grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and earned a BA in English from Brown University and an MA in America Literature from Duke University, where he was a James B. Duke Fellow. He was Brown University’s first Intercollegiate All-American sailor in 1978, the same year he won the Sunfish North Americans in Barrington, Rhode Island. After working as an editor at Sailing World magazine, he wrote and edited several books about sailing, including “The Passionate Sailor,” “Second Wind,” and “Yaahting: A Parody.” In 2000, Philbrick published the “New York Times” bestseller “In the Heart of the Sea,” which won the National Book Award for nonfiction. The book is the basis of the Warner Bros. motion picture “Heart of the Sea,” directed by Ron Howard and starring Chris Hemsworth, Cillian Murphy, Brendan Gleeson, Benjamin Walker, Ben Wishaw, and Tom Holland. The book also inspired a 2001 Dateline special on NBC as well as the 2010 two-hour PBS American Experience film “Into the Deep” by Ric Burns.   Philbrick’s writing has appeared in “Vanity Fair,” “The New York Times Book Review,” “The Wall Street Journal,” the “Los Angeles Times,” and the “Boston Globe”. He has appeared on the “Today” show, “The Morning Show,” “Dateline,” PBS’s “American Experience”, C-SPAN, and NPR.

The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series will be held on Wednesday, June 22 at 6:00 p.m. at the Brown Theatre, 315 W. Broadway, Louisville. Tickets are free for Filson members and $27.20 for non-members (taxes and fees included).  Tickets for this event must be purchased from The Kentucky Center Ticket Service. Please call (502) 584-7777 or visit kentuckyperformingarts.org for tickets

Initiated in 1993 as a memorial to the life of Gertrude Polk Brown and made possible by the generous support of her children, Dace Brown Stubbs and G. Garvin Brown III. The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series has brought both nationally and internationally recognized historians and journalists to Louisville, many of them Pulitzer Prize winners. Speakers are selected based on their overall excellence in research, writing, and speaking and are not restricted to historians. The Filson hosts up to five lectures per year in this series.

The Filson to host public opening for “Forgotten Foundations”

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society will host a public exhibit opening for Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture on Tuesday, April 26, 2022, from 4:30-5:45 p.m. This exhibit is curated by Jana Meyer and Danielle Spalenka.

Forgotten Foundations explores the rise, fall, and revitalization of the urban core. For much of its history, Downtown Louisville was the foundation and heart of the city. Downtown became a hub for many businesses in a post-Civil War building boom. Grand buildings with intricate architectural details were a visual symbol of Louisville’s growing economic power. But as people and businesses relocated to the suburbs, downtown saw a major decline. Buildings once seen as architectural gems were now perceived as outdated. Urban renewal and the expansion of expressways meant that many buildings foundational to the city were demolished. This exhibit will remember what was lost through architectural and photographic records left behind.

The opening reception will feature refreshments and short remarks from the curator and sponsors at 5:30 p.m. All participants must register in advance. To register for this event, please visit www.filsonhistorical.org. This event is free and open to the public.

Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture is generously sponsored by Stock Yards Bank and Trust.

After the opening, the Filson will host Michael Koch for a lecture on his book, Close to Home, which presents the author’s creative, award-winning work and introduces readers to the simple elegance of his designs and meaningful contributions he has made to the landscape of Kentucky. Close to Home is an associated program with Forgotten Foundations, and features projects within a 15-mile radius of Louisville. This event is separate from the exhibit opening and will require a separate registration. “Close to Home” is open to the public, but registration is required. Close to Home is free and open to the public.

“Forgotten Foundations” is open for viewing Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd Street, Louisville. Tours of the exhibit and grounds are free, but reservations are strongly encouraged.

For more information about this exhibit, please contact Maureen Lane, Curator of Museum Collections at gro.l1716532972aciro1716532972tsihn1716532972oslif1716532972@neer1716532972uam1716532972 or (502) 635-5083. For more information on Filson events, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

Owsley Brown II History Center receives AIA award

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society’s Owsley Brown II History Center has received a 2022 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Award. The 2022 Architecture program celebrates the best contemporary architecture regardless of budget, size, style, or type. A nine-member jury selected submissions that demonstrate design achievement, including a sense of place, purpose, history, and environmental sustainability.

“This is a wonderful honor for the architects and for The Filson Historical Society. The building is spectacularly beautiful and highly functional.  It serves as a fantastic place to explore history, a welcome anchor to Old Louisville’s streetscape, and a gathering space for our city, state and region,” said Richard H. C. Clay, President and CEO of the Filson.  “We are grateful to the American Institute of Architects for this recognition.”

The Owsley Brown II History Center, designed by de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop, opened in October 2016 as part of the larger renovation of the Filson’s campus at 3rd and Ormsby. The building has been the recipient of several design awards in addition to the recent AIA award and has been featured in several premier architectural publications.

“We appreciate what a unique opportunity it was to collaborate with the Filson Historical Society’s incredible leadership and personnel on this multi-layered project,” said Roberto de Leon and Ross Primmer in a joint statement. “This highest honor from our peers, and inclusion in such an accomplished group of international projects, reflects both the ongoing vision and tireless commitment of all those involved in the project’s realization.”

For more information about the award, please visit www.aia.org.

About AIA
Founded in 1857, AIA consistently works to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through more than 200 international, state and local chapters, AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public wellbeing.

AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation, and world. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards.

About the Filson Historical Society

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

The Filson opens new exhibit on Louisville’s lost architecture

LOUISVILLE, KY – The Filson Historical Society is proud to announce the opening of their latest exhibit, Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture on February 18. This exhibit is curated by Jana Meyer and Danielle Spalenka.

Forgotten Foundations explores the rise, fall, and revitalization of the urban core. For much of its history, Downtown Louisville was the foundation and heart of the city. Downtown became a hub for many businesses in a post-Civil War building boom. Grand buildings with intricate architectural details were a visual symbol of Louisville’s growing economic power. But as people and businesses relocated to the suburbs, downtown saw a major decline. Buildings once seen as architectural gems were now perceived as outdated. Urban renewal and the expansion of expressways meant that many buildings foundational to the city were demolished. This exhibit will remember what was lost through architectural and photographic records left behind.

Forgotten Foundations will be open for viewing Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm at the Filson Historical Society, 1310 S. 3rd Street, Louisville. Tours of the exhibit and grounds are free, but reservations are strongly encouraged.

The Filson will host a public exhibit opening Tuesday, April 26, 2022, from 4:30-5:45 p.m. The reception will feature refreshments and short remarks from the curator and sponsors at 5:30 p.m. Small groups of 10 will be allowed in the exhibit at one time to view them and speak with the curators. All participants must register in advance. Masks and proof of Covid-19 vaccination or a negative Covid test in the preceding 48 hours are required to attend this event. To register for this event, please visit www.filsonhistorical.org. This event is free and open to the public.

Forgotten Foundations: Louisville’s Lost Architecture is generously sponsored by Stock Yards Bank and Trust.

After the opening, the Filson will host Michael Koch for a lecture on his book, Close to Home, which presents the author’s creative, award-winning work and introduces readers to the simple elegance of his designs and meaningful contributions he has made to the landscape of Kentucky. “Close to Home” is an associated program with Forgotten Foundations, and features projects within a 15-mile radius of Louisville. This event is separate from the exhibit opening and will require a separate registration. Close to Home is open to the public, but registration is required. Close to Home is free for Filson members and $15 for non-members. Masks and proof of Covid-19 vaccination or a negative Covid test in the preceding 48 hours are required to attend this event.

For more information about this exhibit, please contact Maureen Lane, Curator of Museum Collections at gro.l1716532972aciro1716532972tsihn1716532972oslif1716532972@neer1716532972uam1716532972 or (502) 635-5083. For more information on Filson events, please visit filsonhistorical.org.

The Filson Announces Access Program for Low-income Families

Louisville, Ky – Today the Filson Historical Society announced that it has joined Museums for All, a signature access program of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), administered by the Association of Children’s Museums (ACM), to encourage people of all backgrounds to visit museums regularly and build lifelong museum-going habits. The program supports those receiving food assistance (SNAP) benefits receiving a Filson for All membership for one family (two adults and all children 18 and under living in the household) with the presentation of a SNAP Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card. Similar free and reduced admission is available to eligible members of the public at more than 800 museums across the country. Museums for All is part of the Filson’s broad commitment to provide access to anyone for whom cost may be a barrier to visiting the Filson.

The Filson for All membership provides one family (two adults and all children 18 and under living in the household) with access to publications, including “The Filson” newsmagazine and “Ohio Valley History,” a scholarly journal published jointly by the Filson, the Cincinnati Museum Center, and the University of Cincinnati. Members will also receive member pricing to over 40 Filson events per year, one free hour of research or consulting by phone or email, and a reduced rate of $35 per hour for additional research.

For more information on the Filson’s upcoming events, please visit filsonhistorical.org/events or call (502) 635-5083. For more information on the Filson’s Covid-19 policies, please refer to the reopening plan listed on the website.

Museums for All helps expand access to museums and raise public awareness about how museums in the U.S. are reaching their entire communities. More than 800 institutions participate in the initiative, including art museums, children’s museums, science centers, botanical gardens, zoos, history museums, and more. Participating museums are located nationwide, representing all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Virgin Islands.

About the Filson Historical Society

Since its founding in 1884, The Filson Historical Society has preserved the region’s collective memory, not only of Kentucky but also of the Ohio Valley and the Upper South. The Filson continues to collect and share the significant stories of the region. An independent historical society, The Filson serves the public through its extensive research collections and numerous educational opportunities. The Filson is headquartered in the Ferguson Mansion in Old Louisville and offers research facilities, event, and rental space.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About Association of Children’s Museums (ACM)

The Association of Children’s Museums (ACM) champions children’s museums worldwide. With more than 470 members in 50 states and 16 countries, ACM leverages the collective knowledge of children’s museums through convening, sharing, and dissemination. Learn more at www.childrensmuseums.org.