Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Bullitt Family Papers - Oxmoor Collection, 1683-2003. 164 cu.ft.

In a letter dated 27 May 1842 from Martha Bullitt to her brother John she wrote that "Mr. Van Buren was in Louisville, but he was not getting a lot of attention from the genteller part of the community."(143) In a letter dated 6 July 1848 from Logan McKnight to John C. Bullitt he wrote that Lewis Cass, the Democratic nominee for President, has gained popularity "since the secession of Mr. Van Buren and his barnburners."(159) In a letter dated 21 August (no year) from Willis Edwards (Alton, Ill.) to John C. Bullitt he mentioned that Van Buren was visiting Alton.(166) In the 4 August 1840 issue of the Spirit of Old Wayne (Richmond, Ind.) there was an article re: Van Buren and the upcoming presidential election. (3301 ovsz)

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Smith-Love family. Papers, 1821-1901. .33 cu. ft.

The Smith-Love family papers document the public life and career pursuits of an Indiana family. Oliver H. Smith (1794-1859) was a lawyer and Whig politician from Indiana. Smith's correspondence contains letters from William Hendricks (10 Dec. 1833 & 10 Jan. 1834), which discuss Van Buren's character and prospects to be the next president. A letter (5 Sept. 1833) refers to Van Buren's likely nomination at the Baltimore convention.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Atwater, Caleb, 1778-1867 To William Henry Harrison, North Bend, Ohio Circleville, (Ohio), 30 December 1837. ALS, 3pp?

Discusses the current political situation, especially the differences between eastern and western Whigs. States that Harrison would defeat M. Van Buren in an election. Van Buren would carry only New York and a few Southern states, Harrison would get the rest.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Barry, William Taylor, 1785-1835 1 Papers, 1798-1835. 1 vol.

Barry writes his opinion of Van Buren, whom he feels has undermined President Jackson in order to further his own ambitions (pp 167-168).

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Brown, Orlando, 1801-1867. Papers, 1780-1898. 2.66 cu. ft.

On 9 December 1837, R. Hawes writes from Washington, D.C. to O. Brown commenting on the positive changes in the new administration.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Brown-Ewell family. Papers, 1781-1984. 6.33 cu. ft.

A series of undated letters and notes, most sent from Van Buren to Mary Eastin. They primarily concern invitations and replies for visits. In one letter (ca. 1831), Van Buren comments on the appearance of cholera and facetiously states that failure to receive an appointment from the Senate may save him from the disease.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852 To G. W. Featherstonhaugh, Duanesburgh, New York Lexington, Kentucky. 10 October 1824. A.L.S. 3p

Clay writes about the approaching election and discusses Van Buren's support of William H. Crawford.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852. Speech, 4 February 1841. A.Ms. 4p.

Clay argues for an extra session of Congress. Van Buren's administration has been rejecte by the people and no action would mean a continuation of current policies and wold hinder Gen. Harrison's administration. Clay discusses the reasons an extra session is needed and castigates the democrats.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Grigsby family. Papers.

Shelby, Alfred, 1804-1832. Papers, 1819-1832. 2 boxes. Correspondence-letter of introduction.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Kearney, Philip, 1780- To H.D. Smith, Gouverneur, N.Y. Washington, D.C, 19 Jan. 1834.

Kearney says, "Mr. Van Buren presides with dignity in the Senate." Thinks different than most of his friends about Van Buren. Has confidence his administration "will be an able one" and respect the feelings of the community. Cites his opposing extending the "Election Franchise to all the vagrant Irish" and the "Safety Fund System as favorable to Van Buren & says he "has always been a supporter of the Judiciary" and " is not opposed to a U.S. Bank."

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Pirtle and Rogers families. Papers, 1797-1875

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862. To William T. Barry. Washington, Aug. 12, 1829. 1 p. L.S. As to the prospect of recovering fugitive slaves from Canada; returns letter of Mr. (James) Taylor with assurance that they will continue to do all that may be practicable and proper to accomplish the desired purpose.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Bodley family. Papers, 1773-1939. 9.33 cu. ft.

In his 25 March 1832 letter to Thomas Bodley, Wm. Bodley mentions that politics is becoming a hot topic in Mississippi and that there had been several meetings to discuss the course of George Poindexter against Van Burn and Jackson in the upcoming presidential election; in his 19 Nov. 1832 letter to Wm. Bodley, Wm. Hurst writes that he fears for the nation since Andrew Jackson had clinched the presidency; expects Jackson to retire so that Van Buren, who won't be friendly to the South, can take over; in a 2 Dec. 1836 letter to Wm. Bodley, Wm. Bullock regrets that the Southern States had not lived up to their promise and fears that Van Buren will be elected president; Harry Bodley writes Wm. Bodley on 2 June 1842 that Van Buren had attended the wedding ceremony of Eliza Pearce during the previous month.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clark, Sol. (?) To Francis Preston Blair, Washington City. Clarks Mills, Tennessee, 20 March 1833, ALS, 3 PP.

Clark hopes that Blair's loss of "the public printing to both houses of Congress" will result in elevating him just as Van Buren was elevated after the Senate rejected his nomination (as U.S. minister to Great Britain).

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852 To Jabez Delano Hammond, n.p. Washington, 21 Feb. 1827. ALS, 2 pp.

Clay is answering a letter from Hammond of 28 Jan. 1827, in which Hammond outlines political events in New York. Clay comments on the condition of the various political parties in N.Y., the recent Senatorial race there, and how its outcome may affect the upcoming presidential race. He mentions DeWitt Clinton, Martin Van Buren and John Quincy Adams. Says "things are going well with me in almost every other direction" and feels that the Jacksonians are heading for "uttered mortification."

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852 To J. Morrison Harris, Baltimore. "Ashland," 18 Aug. 1848. ALS, 1 p.

Clay discusses the outcome of the Whig Convention at Philadelphia; notes that he wished the results were different; that he will take no partisan part in "the nomination of the merest military person presented as a Candidate for the Presidency;" and that he can't vote for Cass or Van Buren.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852 To Francis T. Brooke, Fredericksburg, Virginia. Washington, D.C. 14 February 1833. A.L.S. 1p.

Clay completed his plan for a compromise on the nullification issue a few days ago and has submitted it as a bill to the Senate. The Van Buren men will try to frustrate it as will Webster and other New England senators.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852 To Isaac Bell, City of New York. Washington, 2 June 1838. LS, 1p.

Clay comments on the current Democratic administration, writing in part that the public affairs of the American people have been "wretchedly administered" but it is wonderful and creditable to the people that they have been so patient. However, the "light has broken upon us." Support for Clay is growing for president.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Clay, Henry, 1777-1852 To Henry M. Brackenridge, Tarentum near Pittsburg, Penn. Ashland [Ky.], 12 Nov. 1843. ALS, 14pp.

In discussing the Compromise of 1833 Clay states the " ill" worked by the Compromise after 1840 was the "fault of the Van Buren Congress in failing to provide an adequate current revenue, and... to provide for the Tariff."

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Corlis-Respess family. Papers, 1754-1934. 2.66 cu. ft.

In a letter of 15 June 1837 Nich. Brown describes the sad state of business in Providence with factory mills closing. He predicts that only a National Bank can solve the problems and that Vah Buren is not likely to allow the creation of such a bank.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Darby, John C. 1812- To Elisha Bartlett Slatersville, R.I. Lexington, Ky., 19 August 1848. ALS, 5 1/2 pp.

In a letter describing his views on slavery and relations between free and slave states, Darby believes that ultimately a widespread movement will lead to the annihilation of Van Buren and others for their attempts to abolish slavery and the resulting disunion of the United States.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Daugherty, Phebe Wood Coburn, ca.1819-1899. Papers, 1818-1899.

In letter dated May 21,1842 writer states "The ex-president Van Buren is in Lexington on a visit to Mr. Clay and will visit Cincinnati during the coming week".

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Dolarhide, Absolem. Document, 1838. 1 item.

Land document from the United States General Land Office regarding land in Vandalia, IL for Absolem Dolarhide on 10 August 1838. Document contains the secretarial signature of President Martin Van Buren.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Foote family. Papers, 1759-1987. Nine boxes and two vols.

In a letter to Richard H. Foote dated 2 August 1843, George Foote writes that in the 1836 Presidential Election he voted for Judge White because there was no ticket run in Alabama for General Harrison and because he preferred [White] to Van Buren.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Gregory, Michail D. Document, 1839. 1 item.

Land document, dated 1 Nov. 1839, from the United States General Land Office regading land in Vandalia, IL for Michail D. Gregory. Document contains the secretarial signature of President Martin Van Buren.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Henry, John F. Documents, 1837, 1839. 2 items.

Two documents from the United State General Land Office regarding the registration of land in Illinois for John Henry on 11 May 1837 and 1 Nov. 1839. Both documents contain the secretarial signature of President Martin Van Buren.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Johnson, Richard Mentor, 1781-1850 To General Andrew Jackson, n.p. Wheeling, 13 March 1837. ALS, 1p.

Johnson recommends to Jackson the case of Jackson's old friend "Reeside" who "will be reduced if he is not settled with literally." Johnson writes that if Jackson would speak to Mr [Martin] Van Buren, all would be right, as Reeside wants what Mr. Barry allowed him and no more. Johnson closes with the statement, "Remember what Reeside has done for us all."

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Johnson, Richard Mentor, 1780-1850. To Francis P. Blair. White Sulphur, Kentucky. 13 March 1842. A.L.S. 2p.

Johnson is satisfied with Blair's course as to the Presidency and feels Van Buren will lose if he runs. Johnson is not ambitious for the position himself.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Pirtle-Rogers family. Papers, 1797-1875. .33 cu. ft.

In a letter dated 12 August 1829, Van Buren writes to W. T. Barry about the prospects of getting runaway slaves back from Canada.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Preston family. Papers - Davie Collection, 1658- 1896.

William C. Preston to Mrs. Sarah B. Preston, 27 Dec. 1834 and 27 Dec. 1835. Both discuss Van Buren's activities and character. William Preston, Washington to Miss Susan M. Preston, Louisville, Ky. Describes a dinner he attended at the White House.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Schermerhorn, J F To General Andrew Jackson, Nashville, Tennessee. On the Ohio, near Louisville, Kentucky. 27 Oct. 1837. A.L.S. 6p.

Gives personal news regarding his marriage and plan to settle in the West. Discusses Indian affairs beyond Missouri and mentions the Osage Indian tribe. Describes political activity in the western territory and Van Burents Indian policy.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Smith, L. To B. W. Smith, Humphreysville, New Haven County, Conn. Holdink, Holmes County, Miss., 25 May 1844. ALS, 3pp.

Smith thinks that Mississippi will "go for" Van Buren against (Henry) Clay in the presidential election of 1844.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Taylor, Elizabeth (Cotton). Document, 1837. litem.

Land document from United States General Land Office regarding land in Ohio for Elizabeth Taylor on 1 October 1837. Document contains the secretarial signature of President Martin Van Buren.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Taylor-Hay family. Papers, 1783-1991. 42 cu. ft.

A letter of 28 January 1843 to John J Crittenden discusses many political subjects. One of the subjects is Calhoun's reaction Jackson's appointment of Van Buren to the Presidency.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Todd, William Morris. Document, 1838. 1 item.

Land document from the United States General Land Office regarding land in Vandalia, IL for William Morris Todd on 10 August 1838. Document contains the secretarial signature of President Martin Van Buren. .

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

The Whig Banher Melodist. Campaign newspaper. Philadelphia, September, 1844. vol. 1, no. 1, 4pp. 47x62cm.

Contains Whig campaign songs, literature and engravings in support of Henry Clay and Theodore Freylinghuysen for president and vice-president, respectively, in 1844. Many of the songs' lyrics praise Clay and the Whigs and are caustic toward Polk, Van Buren, Johnson, and other notable Democrats.

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

Yandell family. Papers, 1823-1887. Bcricei 3. Martin, Smith County, Tennessee to Lumbford Yandell, Louis- ville. 14 February 1840. A.L.S. 2p.

Martin refers to President Van Buren as a "dictator."

Van Buren, Martin, 1782-1862

McAfee, Robert Breckinridge, 1784-1849. Letter, 1838. 1 item.

Robert B. McAfee, who had recently returned to Elm Spring, Kentucky, from Colombia, writes to his friend, George Bohon, living in Marion County, Missouri. The letter, dated 25 September 1838, indicates that he is a strong supporter of the Democratic party and President Van Buren and anticipates his re-election in 1840. He feels that the opposition party contains no decent men in their ranks.