Events Calendar

Events Calendar

Check out our upcoming events on the calendar below!  You can subscribe to our calendar, which will sync our events onto your personal digital calendar.  Just click the “Subscribe ” button below!

Lincoln in Private

The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series – Lincoln in Private

Thursday, January 27, 2022 | 6:00-7:00 pm EST | Free for members,…
Lincoln in Private

The Gertrude Polk Brown Lecture Series – Lincoln in Private Previous

Thursday, January 27, 2022 | 6:00-7:00 pm EST | Free for members, $20 for non-members | Brown Theatre, 315 W. Broadway, Louisville - Tickets for this event must be purchased from The Kentucky Center Ticket Service (members use code FILSON for member pricing). Please call (502) 584-7777 or visit kentuckycenter.org for tickets. | A deeply private man, shut off even to those who worked closely with him, Abraham Lincoln often captured “his best thoughts,” as he called them, in short notes to himself. He would work out his personal stances on the biggest issues of the day, never expecting anyone to see these frank, unpolished pieces of writing, which he’d then keep close at hand, in desk drawers and even in his top hat. The profound importance of these notes has been overlooked, because the originals are scattered across several different archives and have never before been brought together and examined as a coherent whole.

Gideon Shryock: Kentucky’s First Architect

Sunday, December 5, 5:00-4:00 pm - Louisville Free Public Library, Main Branch - This event is produced in partnership with the Louisville Free Public Library. - Gideon Shryock is perhaps Kentucky’s most famous and least known architect of the nineteenth century.  While many Kentuckians can point with pride to Shryock’s great surviving monuments in the Greek Revival style—Frankfort’s Old Kentucky Capitol, Lexington’s Morrison College, and Louisville’ Jefferson County Courthouse—very few are aware of this architect’s fascinating life story, his critical role in the American Greek Revival architectural movement, and the many other buildings, large and small, he constructed during his almost sixty -year-long career.  He was, in fact, Kentucky’s first native-born, professionally trained architect, and a man of great influence in the development of American architectural practice and history.  Co-authors Winfrey Blackburn and Scott Gill present a generously illustrated lecture drawn from their new book, Gideon Shryock: His Life and Architecture, 1802-1880, the first-ever comprehensive biography of this most important of Kentucky architects. 
A sepia toned image depicting raging waters and a destroyed landscape with words overlaid. The title reads "Jonathan Todd Hancock, Convulsed States, Earthquakes, Prophecy, and the Remaking of Early America."

Convulsed States: Earthquakes, Prophecy, and the Remaking of Early America

Thursday, October 7, 6:00-7:00 p.m. - The New Madrid earthquakes of 1811–12 were the strongest temblors in the North American interior in at least the past five centuries. From the Great Plains to the Atlantic Coast and from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, a broad cast of thinkers struggled to explain these seemingly unprecedented natural phenomena. They summoned a range of traditions of inquiry into the natural world and drew connections among signs of environmental, spiritual, and political disorder on the cusp of the War of 1812. Drawn from extensive archival research, Convulsed States probes their interpretations to offer insights into revivalism, nation remaking, and the relationship between religious and political authority across Native nations and the United States in the early nineteenth century.
An image of the historic Ferguson Mansion with a flowering magnolia tree in the foreground. The house is red brick and white stonework. The sky is blue in the background.

Into The Bluegrass, Art & Artistry of Kentucky’s Historic Icons

Kentucky has been called, the “Daughter of the East and Mother of the West.” Mel Hankla’s new book is about Kentucky’s significance in the westward expansion of America. This book tells the stories of early American immigrants and features utilitarian, yet artistic, items they made or used. Hankla’s goal was to verbally weave a tapestry of cultural fabric exhibiting the iconic Kentucky Rifle as the weft of that colorful fabric.
An image of the historic Ferguson Mansion with a flowering magnolia tree in the foreground. The house is red brick and white stonework. The sky is blue in the background.

The 27th Annual House Tour

Thursday, September 23 - In-Person, 5:00-8:00 pm; Virtual, 6:30-7:30 pm - The 27th Annual House Tour will be presented both in-person and virtually in 2021. The in-person 27th Annual House Tour will begin at 5:00 p.m. with a comprehensive tour of the Filson Historical Society campus, the historic Old Louisville Ferguson Mansion. This tour, led by Filson staff, will feature A Child’s World and Women at Work exhibits as well as items from our collection unique to this event. Participants will enjoy a rare whisky toast. Virtual participants will have access to a virtual Ferguson Mansion exhibit prior to the lecture. T 6:30 pm, both in-person and virtual participants will enjoy a lecture by John David Myles, giving a history of the Ferguson Mansion and exploring other work by its architects, Dodd & Cobb.