Racism - Kentucky

Brown, Orlando, 1801-1867. Papers, 1780-1898. 1178 items.

In a letter dated 30 May 1866, Orlando Brown describes an incident in Frankfort wherein a returned black soldier is attacked by "regulators" but having a pistol shoots both of them.

Racism - Kentucky

Willson, Augustus Everett, 1846-1931. Papers, 1865-1921. 21 cubic feet.

Scrapbook 3 contains articles and cartoons (between pages 82-86, 100-103) accusing Willson of using black voters and then denouncing them. The tone of the articles is mostly patronizing when not disparaging. A cartoon on page 138 continues the theme. In Scrapbook 4 (pg. 2, 3, 12, 36) are articles portraying Willson's betrayal of"colored" supporters. In Scrapbook 6 (pg. 13, 16), news articles point out attitudes toward blacks in 1892. This scrapbook also contains a cartoon and description of R. W. Christian and his "frauds" (pg. 53,54; see also pg. 61-63). Scrapbook 6 (pg. 183) also contains a political cartoon portraying a black man grossly as the "Force Bill." In Scrapbook 8 (pg. 133) are further depictions of black voters. Scrapbook 14 (pg. 174-175) includes newspaper, articles of the lynching of a black man, as well as a murder that revealed the attitudes of whites and blacks. Scrapbook 16 (pg. 90-91) includes articles on the lynching of a young black man in Frankfort. See also "Black Patch War" subject card for Willson Papers.

Racism - Kentucky

Belknap, Morris Burke, 1856-1910. Broadside, ca. 1903. 1 item.

Broadside warning voters that the republican nominee for governor of Kentucky, Morris Belknap, had voted for an African American instead of a "Mountain Democrat" for the Register of Land office in 1883.

Racism - Kentucky

Bodley Family. Papers. 1773-1939. 9.33 cu. ft.

In her 29 Oct. 1866 letter, Maria Church mentions a real estate agent in Frankfort who was trying to get the "low Irish and Negroes" off his property and rent it to a decent person."

Racism - Kentucky

Bourbon County (Ky.) Petition, 6 July 1846. 1 item.

A petition signed by 46 citizens of Bourbon Co., KY, requesting that Franklin Hutchison be appointed as a patroller for 'Negro whiskey shops & trading establishments, big meetings and public gatherings throughout the county'.

Racism - Kentucky

Corlis-Respess Family Papers, 1698-1984. 6 cu. ft.

Mary Ann Corlis, in her 13 Jan. 1816 letter, believes that blacks were hard to manage and also thieves; and in her 11 April 1816 letter she states they they can't be trusted; and James Young, in his 24 Feb. 1868 letter states that "Congress cannot make the Niggroe equal."

Racism - Kentucky

Dunn family. Papers, 1854-1977. .66 cubic feet.

In a letter to his father, dated 5 Dec. 1862, Lt. Lewis Dunn, 3rd Ky, Cavalry Rgt. (USA), advises him not to hire a Negro since it is likely that he would either run off or steal a horse, whereas a white man could leave when he pleases but without pay (4). In a letter sent to Lt. Dunn by a Confederate sympathizer in Hopkinsville, Ky., dated 1 June 1865, she laments the fact that former slaves now have more leisure than their former masters (7).

Racism - Kentucky

Galloway family. Papers, 1893-1928. 1 cu. ft.

In letters dated 16 June 1895 and 16 July 1895, Sallie Galloway, having just moved to Mercer County, Ky., writes to her son in Iowa about her and his father's profound dislike for African Americans. She accuses them of theft and being thrift less, and states that she would rather live where there are no African Americans (2,3).

Racism - Kentucky

Grand Army of the Republic. 1895 Encampment Records. 11 cu. ft.

Numerous letters dealing with the concerns of treatment the "Colored Post" of the G.A.R. will receive at the 1895 Encampment of the G.A.R. in Louisville. The newspaper article that caused the concerns is in the scrapbook (p.85) and a letter to a worried post is in the letterbook of the Accommodation Committee (pp.423-24)

Racism - Kentucky

Grant, Jesse Root, 1794-1873. To E.P. Brainard. Covington, Ky., 11 May 1866. ALS, 3 pp.

Grant, father of U.S. Grant, mentions that he was in Washington, D.C., in late February, 1866, when the President vetoed a bill extending the powers of the Freedmen's Bureau. Although claiming to be opposed to slavery, Grant feels that the Negro race is inferior and that extending the right to vote would degrade the government.