The whimsical side of The Filson’s collections

This piece is an original plaster mold used Bright used to create the Louisville Clock. Bright stipulated that the mold had to be exposed to the elements for at least five years before it left his possession. You can find this mold in the Reference Room at The Filson.

(Photo taken by Jamie Evans)

I’m always delighted when my research for events takes me into The Filson’s collections, and I love a good piece of Louisville history. This week, I've been researching the Louisville clock, designed by Barney Bright in the 1970’s. The clock, which is the topic of The Craziest Thing You Ever Saw, a documentary by Alfred Shands, has fascinated me ever since we started planning this event. While viewing the film last week, I learned that The Filson has several of the plaster and scale models designed by Bright in preparation for sculpting the clock. This piece (left) is an original plaster mold used Bright used to create the Louisville Clock. Bright stipulated that the mold had to be exposed to the elements for at least five years before it left his possession. You can find this mold in the Reference Room at The Filson.

While not the craziest thing I've ever seen, this is perhaps one of the coolest things I've seen, and I can’t wait to go downtown to see the clock in person.

Jamie Evans

Jamie Evans is the Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator at The Filson Historical Society. When she isn’t working on publications for The Filson, you can find her behind her sewing machine or out on the roads training for her next big race.

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