Duck…Duck…SOUP!

By the time this post hits the blog, I’ll be lounging and reading on the beaches of South Carolina (thanks, automation!) but in the meantime, I figured I best get to crankin’ out my June “recipe” column. So while I countdown the days until the commencement of my summer vacation (two), I thought What could be a better or more […]

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Finding Your Way Home: Archivist Explores the History of 205 S. Peterson Avenue

This past March I attended Steve Wiser’s lecture titled “Historic Homes of Frankfort Avenue” at the Peterson Dumesnil home. As a resident of the Clifton neighborhood I was excited to learn more about the homes located on—and around— a street I travel daily. As expected, Wiser’s talk was interesting and full of wonderful images and information (if you have yet to attend […]

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Young Faces in Old Spaces: Pioneering the Bicycle Ride Tour

When The Filson was approached by a community member about hosting a tour of older homes owned by younger people, the thought of a bicycle tour was intriguing. In order to accurately plan this tour, two Filson staff members set out to test the feasibility of participants biking from house to house.  Jamie Evans and Jordan Sangmeister used different types […]

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Etiquette Then and Now: Are Manners a Thing of the Past?

With Derby and its associated parties behind us, I thought this an apt time to pen a post rather tangentially related to food and the preparation/serving of: party etiquette. The Filson has a handful of 19th and 20th century books and other manuscript items on the topic of etiquette, something that sadly seems to be falling all too often to the […]

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New Kentucky Derby Gallery

On Monday, May 17, 1875, Colonel Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr. decided to rally the crowds for the Derby and opened the infield to the public free of charge, according to one source. The last nail was hammered into the new grandstand moments before the gate opened and the first racing fans entered. Derby Day at Churchill Downs postcard, ca. 1920-1930s. [Postcard Collection, HRA-21]

It’s arguably the biggest week in Louisville, as the town gets geared up for the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby.  You’ve likely already seen Assistant Curator Johna Picco’s post on the perfect Mint Julep. To continue to help you get in the spirit, whether you are near or far, Associate Curator Heather Stone has compiled a new addition to […]

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Mournful Tunes: Remembering the Death of Abraham Lincoln through Music

150 years ago today, John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre.  Lincoln died the following day on April 15, 1865.  The 150th anniversary of such a momentous event requires some sort of acknowledgement of its passing.  (Or so I was informed when I was brainstorming ideas for this week’s blog post!) As I began sifting through the […]

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A Recap of the Royal Visit to The Filson

If you haven’t heard yet, His Royal Highness, Charles, The Prince of Wales, visited The Filson during his trip to Louisville last month. It was definitely an exciting time for us, not only because of the Royal visit, but also because Louisville was designated a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Both of these events added to […]

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April is #MintJulepMonth

The 141st Kentucky Derby is less than a month away and in keeping with April’s Kentucky Derby Festival celebrations, this month’s Recipes from the Archives features a classic: The Mint Julep. The “Pendennis Club Mint Julep” is found within How to Make Old Kentucky Famed Drinks (Brown Forman Distillery Co., 1934), which features forty-six classic drink recipes. When I first glanced at this […]

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Encountering Margaret Smith

Margaret Smith’s papers came to The Filson by way of the Heyburn family; after Margaret’s death, the son and daughter in law of her employer, a Mrs. Heyburn, reviewed her personal effects, as she had no other family, and saved her six diaries, along with 18 letters, a scrapbook, various pieces of ephemera, and 22 images.  About 25 years later, […]

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Smitten by Miss Sallie

By James M. Prichard Sixteen-year-old Sallie Rowan of McMinnville, Tennessee was no doubt considered one of the most captivating belles in her community during the Civil War. Her surviving papers, which are housed in the Filson’s Special Collections Department, include several letters and calling cards from young Confederate officers who fell under her spell. She apparently caught the eye of […]

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