Louise Leland: Kentucky’s First Female Architect

Born in Springfield, Illinois in 1902, Louise Leland was the daughter of Jerome and Gertrude Akin Leland. Jerome, a descendant of the Lelands connected with some of the country’s earliest examples of fine hotels (examples include: Metropolitan Hotel and Sturtevant House, New York City; Grand Union Hotel, Saratoga Springs; Occidental Hotel, San Francisco and Leland Hotel, Springfield), was himself employed […]

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Halloween-spiration through the decades

Needing some last minute Halloween-spiration for a costume?  Here are a few costume ideas through the decades from our Photograph Collections: Cowboy 2. Indian 3. Dutch boy or girl   4. Clown 5. Hillbilly   6. Hula Girl  7. George Rogers Clark Whatever you decide to dress up as, I hope you have a fun and safe Halloween!!

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Is This Thing On? — #OralHistoryDay at FHS

In celebration of Kentucky’s inaugural #OralHistoryDay, FHS’s archivists gathered first thing this morning to discuss and devise a plan. First order of business? Define what an oral history is (and what it is not). A helpful resource Doing Oral History breaks it down like this The next step for the group was to determine, based on the above definition, which holdings of The Filson’s would constitute as oral history. We […]

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[Eye] Candy: No Tricks just Treats

Nothing says Halloween more than candy. And nothing says candy like 20 lbs. of fudge. In the spirit of fall, candy, and all things Halloween, this month I’m sharing a recipe from the recently acquired Reed’s Candy Stores recipe book [Mss. BB R323]. Once located at 3600 W. Market as well as Fourth and Oak (building still stands at 3600 […]

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The Forgotten War of Captain Craik

Captain James S. Craik (1921-2004) of Louisville was proud of his service as a C-47 transport pilot in the Army Air Corps during World War II. From an airfield in northwestern India, he flew over 211 missions deep into Burma, a land of treacherous weather, forbidding mountains and vast jungle terrain. He also completed three missions flying “The Hump”, the […]

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Kentucky Archives Month 2015: Voting and Civil Rights

As we move into fall and the Halloween season, I wanted to remind everyone that October is also an important month here in the archives.  October is American Archives Month and we will be celebrating here in Kentucky! For a little background, Kentucky Archives Week began in 2002, following a national trend of states and localities celebrating a local archives […]

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Autumn, as depicted by Patty Thum

Welcome to autumn!  This beautiful scene by Louisville artist Patty Thum inspires fall feelings in me.  My former colleague Robin Wallace shared the following information on Thum at one of our “Women in the Filson’s Special Collections” lectures: Louisville’s Patty Prather Thum was first tutored in drawing by her mother.  As many female artists did, she learned at home. Thum […]

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Give Local Louisville – October 1, 2015

On Thursday, October 1, 2015, you will have the opportunity to make your support of The Filson Historical Society go even further! The Filson Historical Society is a proud participant of Give Local Louisville 2015. Give Local Louisville is a 24-hour, online “give day” to support local nonprofits doing great work in our city. For one day, every dollar given […]

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“It Gives Me Pleasure” : The past and present history of quilting bees

Note: We’re sorry about the radio silence on the blog! Due to technical difficulties, we were not able to post a blog post last week. “The Lone Quilter” I am what some call a “lone quilter.” Prior to this year, I did not belong to any quilting guilds, sewing bees, or swap groups. I started sewing when I was given […]

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A Tale of Two Floors

Time – and tools – do indeed change things. Those who have visited the second floor of The Filson to use the library and attend programs no doubt remember what it looked like. That was “once upon a time.” As the new Owsley Brown II History Center continues to rise and the interior of the carriage house is completely remade […]

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