Music in Wartime: Song Composition during the First World War

by Pauline Ottaviano. World War I was a time of great change for the American people.  They lived in a time when nearly everything was unsure.  Men were being drafted and leaving home and work.  Paper and other goods had to be saved.  Money was tight.  One thing that kept families and soldiers alike going was music.  The music of […]

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Fun with Flags: A Pictorial Celebration of Flag Day

If you are a fan of the show The Big Bang Theory, then you definitely know about Sheldon’s YouTube/podcast show, “Sheldon Cooper presents: Fun with Flags,” which was created by characters Sheldon Cooper and Amy Farrah Fowler to teach vexillology, the study of flags and related emblems. While I myself am not a scholar of flags, I do appreciate a […]

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To The Halls of Montezuma: A Kentuckian in Mexico

By James M. Prichard, Manuscript Cataloger   The outbreak of the Mexican War found Simon Bolivar Buckner serving as a young second lieutenant in the 2nd United States Infantry. A recent graduate of West Point, the future Confederate general and Kentucky governor was detailed as assistant instructor of Geography, History, and Ethics at the Academy. When war came in the spring […]

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Exploring Louisville’s South End

I’m always fascinated by how much the built environment has changed over time.  Businesses and residences that once were integral parts of the landscape have long since been demolished, many leaving little trace of their existence beyond what was captured by a camera lens.  Other structures survive but only as shells of their former selves – rundown eyesores, sagging and […]

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Have You Ordered Your Summer Piano Yet?

[C/B Baldwin Company]

In June of 1913, with the summer travel season coming on, the Louisville sales office of the Baldwin Company engaged in a direct mail marketing campaign to sell pianos to rural families. According to the letter, sent to Mrs. G. H. Fleck of Jeffersontown, Kentucky, the company had but just then realized that their efforts in advertising in the city […]

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The Dresden Plate Quilt

Ah, the Dresden Plate. A pattern that looks fairly complicated but actually isn’t. This type of pattern is one of my favorites, simply because it’s easy but not boring. You get to play with a fun template, there’s lots of ironing, and it looks pretty cool when you are done. You might be wondering why I’m telling you the virtues […]

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Ferguson Mansion Third Floor Move

This past week, The Filson’s Development, Programming, and Special Collections Departments all moved out of the Ferguson Mansion’s third floor to allow for renovation work to begin.      Development and Special Collections staff offices have moved to the Ferguson Mansion’s basement, while members of the Programming Department are temporarily back in their original location on the first floor while renovations continue […]

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Construction of Camp Zachary Taylor

[Above image: View of Camp Zachary Taylor, WW I-16.] Camp Zachary Taylor (CZT) was created in June 1917 for the purpose of training American troops following the United States entry into World War I in April that year.  The camp was located southeast and south of Louisville, with camp headquarters being north of the later Poplar Level Road and the […]

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Louisville’s Women’s City Club Helped Establish Food Safety Standards in 1920s

When I first started the “Recipes from the Archives” blog series, I really had just one goal in mind: use the monthly post as a vehicle to better understand our collections. It wasn’t long into the process that I realized (but wasn’t surprised) that the series would be a bit more random than I had first intended. That is, all […]

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Women’s History Events at The Filson!

In celebration of Women’s History Month, The Filson is offering the following programming during the month of March: Tuesday, March 1 Row by Row: Talking with Kentucky Gardeners, Katherine J. Black For two and a half years, Katherine J. Black crisscrossed Kentucky, interviewing home vegetable gardeners from a rich variety of backgrounds. Row by Row: Talking with Kentucky Gardeners is the result, […]

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