‘Her’Story: Women in the Filson’s Special Collections: Frances Ingram, Neighborhood House, and Settlement Work

This summer’s Filson Friday talks by staff members of The Filson included a two part series entitled ‘Her’Story: Encountering Women in The Filson’s Special Collections.  The blog will occasionally be featuring some of the women and women’s organizations discussed during these sessions. As evidenced by participation in equal rights associations and women’s clubs, women of the late nineteenth and early […]

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“Little Mac”: A brief biography of General George Brinton McClellan

George Brinton McClellan, organizer and first General of the Army of the Potomac and presidential candidate who ran against Abraham Lincoln in 1864, was well known to the people in the Ohio River Valley.  McClellan was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania into a life of privilege.  Raised to be a gentleman, McClellan entered the University of Pennsylvania at the age of […]

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‘Her’story: Encountering Women in the Filson Collections: Ethel du Pont and labor activism.

This summer’s Filson Friday talks by staff members of The Filson included a two part series entitled ‘Her’Story: Encountering Women in The Filson’s Special Collections.  The blog will occasionally be featuring some of the women and women’s organizations discussed during these sessions. By Sarah-Jane Poindexter Restricted by legal and cultural practices, religious and education traditions, women did not enter or […]

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‘Her’Story: Women in the Special Collections: Mary Barr Clay, the Louisville Equal Rights Association, and Women’s Rights

This summer’s Filson Friday talks by staff members of The Filson included a two part series entitled ‘Her’Story: Encountering Women in The Filson’s Special Collections.  The blog will occasionally be featuring some of the women and women’s organizations discussed during these sessions. Throughout the history of the United States, women have taken part in activism.  Activism can be defined as […]

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‘Her’Story: Women in The Filson’s Special Collections: Mary “Polly” Shreve and the American Revolution

This summer’s Filson Friday talks by staff members of The Filson included a two-part series entitled ‘Her’Story: Encountering Women in The Filson’s Special Collections.  The blog will occasionally be featuring some of the women and women’s organizations discussed during these sessions.             When imagining women during the American Revolution, one’s mind might immediately go to […]

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Bulldog in the Bluegrass: J. Stoddard Johnston’s 1853 Yale Class Book

Earlier this year, the Special Collections Department received J. Stoddard Johnston’s 1853 Class Book from Yale College as a transfer from The Filson’s Library.  The Class Book provides an interesting glimpse into Johnston’s life and surroundings at Yale.  Colonel Josiah Stoddard Johnston (1833-1913) served as a staff officer in the Civil War, and was the editor of the Frankfort Kentucky […]

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Is it always this hot?

One of the most common expressions heard here in Louisville during the months of July and August is “ugh it’s hot!” This summer has certainly been no exception with frequent heat advisories and warnings. It tends to make you wonder, “Is it always this hot?” I happen to have a slight fascination with weather and when I wanted to know […]

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The King of the Bootleggers and Kentucky

In 1927 Courier-Journal prohibition reporter Mary Chenoweth exposed two corrupt officials in northern Kentucky.  This clash between the Courier-Journal and the local government is documented in the Robert Worth Bingham Additional Papers through correspondence and legal depositions on bootlegging in northern Kentucky. In a nine page letter dated 18 April 1927, Bingham summarized the history of corruption in the area […]

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“A day to be forgotten?”

August 4th will be here in less than a month – 23 days to be exact. And why is this date significant? Well, it marks the date Dom Perignon found just the right recipe for that first bottle of champagne in 1693. It was the day in 1862 that the United States government instituted the first income tax – 3 […]

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The Pleasure Ridge Park Distillery

In the years before National Prohibition, there was a distillery in southwest Jefferson County called the Pleasure Ridge Park Distillery. This distillery was put out of business by prohibition and faded from the local memory. All that remains of the distillery is the street named “Railroad Avenue” that runs where the railroad spur that connected to the distillery was located. […]

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