Jonathan Clark – A Witness to History

Jonathan Clark, of the famous Clark family, passed away on November 25, 1811 – 200 years ago this month. Born in August 1750 in Albemarle County, Virginia, Clark was the oldest of the ten children of John and Ann Rogers Clark. Two of his younger brothers – George Rogers and William – achieved great fame; George for his exploits in Kentucky […]

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Baby Love

In honor of two of the Filson’s beloved employees and their new bundles of joy, we give our love and offer these baby images culled from the Filson collection. Congratulations Jennie and Sasha!!!                                        

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Found in the stacks: “The Filson Club and It’s Activities 1884-1922”

Here at The Filson, the majority of my day-to-day responsibilities – on paper at least – revolve around increasing membership and growing the annual fund. But while searching through the stacks for a replacement issue of a past copy of Ohio Valley History, I stumbled upon a book that caught my attention. There sitting next to the back issues of […]

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Stories Told and Hidden

By Robin Wallace History is subjective, and that certainly includes family history.  The stories that are passed down from generation to generation are those that are deemed suitable (whether consciously or unconsciously) to become a part of the threads that weave the tapestry of a family’s narrative. My great-grandfather Ferdinand Zimmerer came to the United States via Ellis Island in […]

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Math, History, and William Marshall Bullitt

Math: the subject that keeps me from getting a degree in meteorology and has been known to bring tears to my eyes. Whatever you call it, it is not something I am particularly good at.  Though I do have fondness for algebra and trigonometry, on the whole, math and I are not friends. Don’t even talk to me about calculus; […]

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Louisville Bridges: Some Things Never Change

Back in the 1920s the city of Louisville was looking toward the river and a connection with Southern Indiana in order to promote economic growth. This political cartoon by Van Leshout ran in the Louisville Daily Herald back then, but could easily be adapted for today.  Substitute “2nd Street Bridge” for “East End Bridge” and it would strike a chord […]

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‘Her’Story: Women in the Filson’s Special Collections: Frances Ingram, Neighborhood House, and Settlement Work

This summer’s Filson Friday talks by staff members of The Filson included a two part series entitled ‘Her’Story: Encountering Women in The Filson’s Special Collections.  The blog will occasionally be featuring some of the women and women’s organizations discussed during these sessions. As evidenced by participation in equal rights associations and women’s clubs, women of the late nineteenth and early […]

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“Little Mac”: A brief biography of General George Brinton McClellan

George Brinton McClellan, organizer and first General of the Army of the Potomac and presidential candidate who ran against Abraham Lincoln in 1864, was well known to the people in the Ohio River Valley.  McClellan was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania into a life of privilege.  Raised to be a gentleman, McClellan entered the University of Pennsylvania at the age of […]

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‘Her’story: Encountering Women in the Filson Collections: Ethel du Pont and labor activism.

This summer’s Filson Friday talks by staff members of The Filson included a two part series entitled ‘Her’Story: Encountering Women in The Filson’s Special Collections.  The blog will occasionally be featuring some of the women and women’s organizations discussed during these sessions. By Sarah-Jane Poindexter Restricted by legal and cultural practices, religious and education traditions, women did not enter or […]

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