The Forgotten War of Captain Craik

Captain James S. Craik (1921-2004) of Louisville was proud of his service as a C-47 transport pilot in the Army Air Corps during World War II. From an airfield in northwestern India, he flew over 211 missions deep into Burma, a land of treacherous weather, forbidding mountains and vast jungle terrain. He also completed three missions flying “The Hump”, the […]

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Kentucky Archives Month 2015: Voting and Civil Rights

As we move into fall and the Halloween season, I wanted to remind everyone that October is also an important month here in the archives.  October is American Archives Month and we will be celebrating here in Kentucky! For a little background, Kentucky Archives Week began in 2002, following a national trend of states and localities celebrating a local archives […]

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“It Gives Me Pleasure” : The past and present history of quilting bees

Note: We’re sorry about the radio silence on the blog! Due to technical difficulties, we were not able to post a blog post last week. “The Lone Quilter” I am what some call a “lone quilter.” Prior to this year, I did not belong to any quilting guilds, sewing bees, or swap groups. I started sewing when I was given […]

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New in the Library

Although we have been quite busy moving parts of the library to make way for renovations, new items continue to arrive for the collection.  Here is a list of some books that have been given to us over the last few months. Frederick Law Olmstead: Plans and views of public parks, by Charles E. Beverage. First Virginia Avenue Missionary Baptist […]

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The Case of the Avaricious Businesswoman

It was a mundane Monday morning in the archives. I had just started a new project and was sorting the records of a nursing home for the elderly in Louisville. I was surrounded (quite literally) by stacks of meeting minutes, reports, and financial records. If it sounds a bit snooze-worthy, it wouldn’t be far from the truth. But then I […]

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A Kentuckian in Paris: the Travel Diary of Dr. Thomas Sanders, Jr.

The Sanders family papers represent only one of the many valuable sources on early Kentucky life available for research at The Filson Historical Society. Dating from 1799 to 1928, the collection includes letters, receipts, and legal instruments from the Sanders family of Shelby and Hart Counties, Ky., including items from related families, the Hardins and Todds. The earliest letters include […]

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Duck…Duck…SOUP!

By the time this post hits the blog, I’ll be lounging and reading on the beaches of South Carolina (thanks, automation!) but in the meantime, I figured I best get to crankin’ out my June “recipe” column. So while I countdown the days until the commencement of my summer vacation (two), I thought What could be a better or more […]

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Finding Your Way Home: Archivist Explores the History of 205 S. Peterson Avenue

This past March I attended Steve Wiser’s lecture titled “Historic Homes of Frankfort Avenue” at the Peterson Dumesnil home. As a resident of the Clifton neighborhood I was excited to learn more about the homes located on—and around— a street I travel daily. As expected, Wiser’s talk was interesting and full of wonderful images and information (if you have yet to attend […]

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Etiquette Then and Now: Are Manners a Thing of the Past?

With Derby and its associated parties behind us, I thought this an apt time to pen a post rather tangentially related to food and the preparation/serving of: party etiquette. The Filson has a handful of 19th and 20th century books and other manuscript items on the topic of etiquette, something that sadly seems to be falling all too often to the […]

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New Kentucky Derby Gallery

On Monday, May 17, 1875, Colonel Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr. decided to rally the crowds for the Derby and opened the infield to the public free of charge, according to one source. The last nail was hammered into the new grandstand moments before the gate opened and the first racing fans entered. Derby Day at Churchill Downs postcard, ca. 1920-1930s. [Postcard Collection, HRA-21]

It’s arguably the biggest week in Louisville, as the town gets geared up for the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby.  You’ve likely already seen Assistant Curator Johna Picco’s post on the perfect Mint Julep. To continue to help you get in the spirit, whether you are near or far, Associate Curator Heather Stone has compiled a new addition to […]

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