Filson Launches YouTube Channel!

By Sarah-Jane Poindexter Have you ever wondered if the Filson collections include old film footage?  They do! Have you missed a lecture and wished you could view it later at your convenience?  Now you can! The Filson is pleased to introduce an institutional YouTube channel.  This channel allows visitors to glimpse digitized footage from historical films & home movies, watch select Filson […]

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Colonel Sanders

The front Great Room at the Filson Historical Society boasts one of the most recognized faces in the world with a connection to Kentucky. No, not Henry Clay, his portrait is in the dining room. It is not Abraham Lincoln, although we do have a portrait of him also. Situated amongst the busts of Generals and Senators and the paintings […]

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Mr. Skygak, From Mars.

It is always interesting to note what people collected in their scrapbooks. While cataloging the Charles Brandenburg Scrapbook, I found it interesting that he collected a series of one panel comics from newspapers between 1907 and 1909. This comic was titled “Mr. Skygak, From Mars”, done by A. D. Condo. This strip is often referred to as the first “Science […]

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What did the “Thunderbolt of the Confederacy” carry in his pocket?

A tiny bible! This small pocket Bible, signed on the title page by John Hunt Morgan, was carried by him during the Civil War.  It became a part of the Filson’s rare collection in 1955 as a gift from John Wilson Townsend. Born June 1, 1825 in Huntsville, Alabama, John Hunt Morgan was the eldest of Calvin and Henrietta Hunt […]

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Pronunciation Conundrum Solved

Returning to Louisville to rejoin the Filson staff, I found it both fitting and appealing that my initial cataloguing work was on a collection of Filson Club letters – what better way to re-immerse myself into the history of Louisville and Filsoniana?  Little did I know that within these letters I would discover the Filson’s definitive answer to that age-old […]

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Norman Kohlhepp, Renaissance Man

Currently being processed in Special Collections are the papers and photographs of Louisvillian Norman Kohlhepp (1892 – 1986).  Kohlhepp was a multi-talented individual who excelled in the fields of science, art  and education.  A graduate of Louisville’s Manual Training High School, he went on to obtain a degree in metallurgical engineering from the University of Cincinnati.   After graduating, he […]

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Postcards – Summer Pastimes

The Filson recently produced a set of six postcards with the theme of “Summer Pastimes.” These postcards celebrate the season with scenes of enjoyment of the outdoors and relaxation, all set in the Kentucky area, and all from The Filson’s Special Collections. They are available for purchase for $5.oo, either at The Filson or online, at http://www.sagepayments.net/eftcart/product_detail.asp?part=044. This first postcard […]

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Dr. Richard Price – Observations on Airplanes

One of our oldest works is entitled Considerations on the Order of Cincinnatus, which was printed for J. Johnson in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, London in 1785. Included in the book is an abstract of Dr. Richard Price’s Observations on the Importance of the American Revolution, with notes and reflections upon that work.  Dr. Price was a fellow of the Royal Society […]

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John J. Crittenden and Narciso López’s 1851 Expedition to Cuba

I have had a long-standing interest in American filibustering expeditions to the Caribbean and Latin America during the 1850s, and to my delight, I recently stumbled across a letter from Kentucky governor, U.S. Senator and Representative, and cabinet member John J. Crittenden, then serving as U.S. Attorney General, discussing the aftermath of Narciso López’s failed 1851 expedition to Cuba.  In August 1851, […]

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Pish posh

“Pish posh said Hieronymus Bosch.” – Nancy Willard I recently stumbled upon an arresting print in The Filson’s Special Collections. This brilliantly tinted picture is something of a mystery, since the signature of the artist is too faint to read. There is also German writing on the back of the print. However, written in English are the words “Herman Gunter […]

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