Health Care for African Americans in the Falls City: The Creation of a Second Louisville

I have recently been reading about health care in Louisville at the turn of the twentieth century, especially as it concerned the city’s African American population.  In honor of Black History Month, I will share some of what I have learned. In the decades following the Civil War, African Americans explored new avenues of opportunity and advancement, including the field […]

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Advertising in The Filson’s Collections

As an advertising/graphic design person, I have always been interested in graphics, ads, books, magazines, stationary, etc. I designed my own wedding invitations, and for each of our moves I sent out customized moving announcements. If you’ve sent me a card, chances are I still have it. One of my favorite classes in college was my History of Communication course. I loved […]

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When It All Comes Together

We have a lot of fantastic information resources in this town.  Never was this more apparent to me than during a recent research endeavor done for personal purposes.  I had been lucky enough to be invited over to a friend’s home in Old Louisville for a dinner party. During the course of the evening, the inevitable “when was this house […]

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A history of UofL’s Belknap campus

I was recently discussing the addition of new buildings to the architectural landscape of the University of Louisville with another former student.  The conversation eventually turned to the history of the site prior to its use by the University.  There is nothing like working in a library when it comes to satisfying your curiosity regarding local history.  With a little […]

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Magic lantern slides reveal Louisville history

By Kathy Jones, Filson Volunteer The Filson recently received seventy glass lantern slides rescued by a realtor from the attic of a Louisville house. She knew only that they came from the All-Prayer Foundlings Home. The Filson’s library collection includes a pamphlet on the All-Prayer FoundlingsHome, The Golden Key, written by G. C. Cromer, the founder of the home, on […]

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Who was George Welby?

The Filson’s Special Collections has a sample book from the 1850s lithograph firm of Henry Miller and Co. which includes many colorful sample labels for items such as tobacco, perfumes and spirits. One of the labels is for Bourbon Whiskey from Geo. Welby. The question to answer is who was this George Welby who is purchasing bourbon labels? In the […]

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A new collection of records of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad available for research

It wasn’t called “The Old Reliable” without good cause. Additional records of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company (L&N) from 1850 to 1900 have surfaced and are now available for viewing at the Filson. The railroad has impressed with its resilience, surviving the Civil War and the Great Depression along with social and technological changes throughout its 132 years. It […]

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Chew on This…a Bit More

I’m composing this quick post as a follow up to one of my early posts here on The Filson blog, dated 11 May 2011 – “Chew on This.”  In that post, I described some historic “prizes” contained within chewing gum packages, including illustrations of Confederate generals, which could be pasted into a collector’s book. Little did I know, we hold […]

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After the Fall

The Filson has several collections that have accounts of Kentuckians traveling in Europe.  Recently, we accessioned a scrapbook from Laura Woodson Callis Stewart and her trip to Europe in 1948. Laura and her husband David left the United States in March of 1948 to travel to Belgium for training as missionaries in Africa. While in training the couple traveled to […]

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A flock of turkeys and Mrs. P: A social medium from the early 20th century

By Heather Fox While cataloging a recently acquired collection of photographs related to the Breckinridge family, I came across a grouping of intriguing “real photo postcards” (RPPCs) taken of a family of tenant farmers living at one of the Breckinridge’s farms in Monticello, Illinois.  The eleven postcards not only provide a glimpse of rural life at the beginning of the […]

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